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Articles by Nicole Wilde

Interacting with Fearful Dogs

Anyone who does shelter or rescue work for any length of time encounters their share of fearful dogs—I am no exception. There were the many frightened dogs who were impounded during my time as Volunteer Coordinator for West Valley shelter in the 90s; the thirty-plus wolves and wolfdogs at Villalobos Rescue Center, where I spent many years socializing and caring for them; and in my own home, with my skittish, fearful German Shepherd Soko, who passed away at the age of 13 this April. I have always had a special place in my heart for the fearful ones.

In working with fearful dogs, understanding how human body language affects them is crucial. The way we move and act has a direct impact on a dog’s emotional response. Honing the finer points of human body language in relation to dogs will allow us to not appear threatening, and to gain a dog’s trust. Being able to put a frightened dog at ease is an invaluable skill for shelter workers, rescue workers, those who foster dogs, and, of course, owners. To that end, below is an excerpt from my book, Help for Your Fearful Dog.

The following tips on human body language are applicable when interacting with any dog, but are especially important when dealing with a fearful dog. Adopt these mannerisms and teach others who interact with your dog to do so as well:

1. Let the dog come to you. If your dog is frightened, she must be allowed to decide whether or not to approach. Don’t restrain your dog and force her to accept contact from others. Remember the "fight or flight" response; if you take away the opportunity for flight, your dog’s choices are limited.

2. Turn to the side. Facing a dog directly is more confrontational than keeping your body turned partially or completely to the side; even turning your head to the side will make a frightened dog feel less anxious.

3. No staring, please! A direct stare is a threat in the animal kingdom (and on New York City subways!). It is perfectly fine to look at your dog; just soften your expression and don’t "hard stare" directly into her eyes. Do not allow children to put their faces near your dog’s face or to stare into her eyes.

4. Don’t hover. Leaning over a dog can cause the dog to become afraid and possibly defensive. The one time I was bitten while working in a Los Angeles city animal shelter happened when I went to return an adorable, fluffy white dog to her pen. While placing her on the ground, I inadvertently reached over her equally adorable little pen mate—who jumped up and bit me in the face.

5. Pet appropriately. Approaching dogs by patting them on the head is ill-advised. Envision the interaction from the dog’s point of view; a palm approaching from above can be alarming. I do a demonstration with kids to teach them how to pet dogs properly. The child plays the role of the dog; I tell the child that I will pet him in two different ways, and he is to tell me which is nicer. First, I reach my hand slowly toward the child’s cheek and stroke it, smiling and softly saying, "Good dog!" Next, I bring my hand brusquely palm-down over the child’s head repeatedly, while loudly saying, "Good dog, good dog!" Kids almost invariably like the first method better. If dogs could answer for themselves, nine out of ten dogs would vote for the first method as well! It’s not that dogs should never be petted on top of the head, but that head-patting (or petting over the dog’s shoulders, back, or rump) should not be used as an initial approach. It is wiser to make a fist, hold it under the dog’s nose to allow her to sniff, then pet the dog on the chest, moving gradually to the sides of the face and other body parts, assuming the dog is comfortable. Likewise, a hand moving in quickly to grab for a dog’s collar is more potentially fear-inducing than a hand moving slowly to a dog’s chest, scratching it, then moving up to take hold of the collar.

6. Stoop, don’t swoop. Small dogs in particular are often swooped down upon when people want to pick them up. Fast, direct, overhead movements are much more frightening than slow, indirect ones. To lift a small dog, crouch down, pet the dog for a moment, then gently slip your hands under her belly and chest, and lift.

7. Watch your smile. While humans interpret a smile as friendly, a dog might not be as fond of seeing your pearly whites. A show of teeth is, after all, a threat in the animal kingdom. A friend of mine once accompanied me to visit the wolves at the rescue center. She patiently sat on the ground, motionless. Finally, a large, black wolf approached to investigate. Unable to contain herself, she broke out in a huge, toothy grin. The wolf darted away as though she had raised a hand to hit him. The lesson? Save the dazzling toothpaste smile for charming your dates and accepting awards. Smile at canines with a closed mouth.

Nicole Wilde, CPDT-KA (Certified Pet Dog Trainer) is the author of six canine-related books including So You Want to be a Dog Trainer and the above-referenced Help for Your Fearful Dog (Phantom Publishing), available at www.phantompub.com. Nicole presents seminars both domestically and internationally, is a Faculty and Advisory Board Member of the Companion Animal Sciences Institute, co-stars in the Train Your Dog: The Positive Gentle Method DVD, is featured in the Dog Whisperer (with Paul Owens) DVDs, contributes training articles to various publications in print and online, including Modern Dog Magazine and Dog Star Daily. Nicole can be reached at phantmwlf@aol.com.

(c) 2006 Nicole Wilde. All rights reserved.